Stunning aerial tour shows Game of Thrones sets

The eighth and final season of “Game of Thrones” premieres exactly one week from today.

And since that date can’t come quickly enough, here’s something to satiate your appetite over the next week: an aerial tour of the top Game of Thrones filming locations.

You won’t find Khaleesi in these videos, but instead, you’ll find spectacular beauty of ancient cities that still stand today, as well as epic landscapes that aren’t just Hollywood CGI. And all of them are shot via drone, and curated by the team at drone video-sharing site AirVuz.

Most of the outdoor footage seen in the show was created across six countries: Croatia, Iceland, Malta, Spain, the United Kingdom and Morocco.

In honor of season eight of the hit series, check out this collection of eight videos all shot by drone, showing some of the top spots from the past seven seasons of “Game of Thrones.”

Westeros (it’s actually Dubrovnik, Croatia)

Dubrovnik, Croatia, serves as the fictional King’s Landing capital city of Westeros. The well-preserved, 11th century city is a magnificent Croatian seaport. Even if you’re not a Game of Thrones enthusiast, it has played a major role in other films recently, including “Star Wars: The Last Jedi.”

Daenarys’ Throne Room (it’s actually Diocletian’s Palace in Split, Croatia)

Also in Croatia but a bit farther north along the Dalmatian Coast, you’ll find Split. Split has stunning beaches, Roman and Venetian ruins, and architecture spanning centuries, including the famous Diocletian’s Palace. In that palace, you’ll find the room where Daenarys trained her dragons.

Highgarden (it’s actually the Castillo de Almodóvar del Río in southern Spain)

If you tuned in last season, you’ll recognize Highgarden, which is actually an 8th century Moorish (Muslim) castle called the Castillo de Almodóvar del Río. The castle is situated in the province of Cordoba, part of Spain’s semi-autonomous Andalusia region.

Dathraki horsemen (it’s actually Almería Tierra de Dragones in Spain)

Also in Andalusia, you’ll find the site of the Dathraki horsemen in Seasons 5 and 6 of “Game of Thrones.” As the video proves, the inland area is extremely dry and mountainous. And if it looks more familiar than you though, it’s because the area was also used to film the 1966 classic “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly” and “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.”

Harrenhal (it’s actually Dunluce Castle in Northern Island)

Heading over to Ireland, you’ll find Harrenhal, the largest castle in Westeros. It’s actually now in ruins as the Dunluce Castle, located in County Antrim at the very northern tip of Northern Ireland.

The land “Beyond the Wall” (it’s actually Iceland’s Vatnajökull National Park)

If you’re looking for the land “Beyond the Wall” inhabited by Wildlings in seasons six and seven of “Game of Thrones,” head to Iceland. In particular, it’s Vatnajökull National Park, home of the largest glacier in Europe. Within its massive area of 8.1k square km (3k square mi) lie many caves resulting from melting patterns within the icecap.  

Eastwatch-by-the-Sea (it’s actually Reynisfjara, Iceland)

Also in Iceland, you’ll find the country’s famous black sand beaches, as well as the site of Eastwatch-by-the-Sea, where Jon Snow lands with Jorah Mormond, and Gendry in Episode 5, Season 7 of “Game of Thrones.”

The arch where Daenerys married Khal Drogo (it’s actually Malta’s Azure Window)

This piece of drone footage is particularly special, because the site looks completely different now. The now-mythical Azure Window was a rock formation off the coast of the island of Gozo, the second island of Malta.  The window collapsed in 2017, disappearing forever.  Prior to its collapse, it was burned into the world’s cultural conciousness by appearing in the pilot episode of “Game of Thrones” as the arch was where Daenerys married Khal Drogo.

Which spot is your favorite? Be on the lookout for more incredible filming locations — and get ready to drone, when the new season premiers next week.